Serendipitous Frugality

Our house had no window coverings when we bought it. I was OK with that. We’re out in the country with no close neighbors.

Also, our previous house was dark and I enjoyed the light coming in the windows here, and I didn’t want to block that. It always felt like living in a cave in that other house, but this one is light and bright.

I have managed to put minimal window treatments up in all the rooms except the kitchen. I didn’t know what I wanted there and I truly didn’t want to block the light.

curtainpanels

It’s interesting how things are presented to you when you look. At an estate sale, I found these lace curtain panels. They were $.25 each. I bought all 8 of them. With a little cutting and hemming, they will work well on my kitchen windows.

I call this serendipitous frugality. We were looking for other items at that estate sale, but these curtains were there waiting for me. The lesson of this little story is that opportunities present themselves when you are looking and, sometimes, it will only cost $2.00.

The Fabric Reduction Challenge

I love buying fabric. I love having fabric. I love working with fabric. I have a mountain of fabric

For many years, I was working too many hours and didn’t have time to sew as much as I wanted. My buying overwhelmed my usage. Now, I fear that it’s out of control.

I’m trying to make up for it by sewing my way out of the avalanche.  While searching the Internet for ideas, I found these great coasters. They are a quick and easy project which can use up fabric and provide a useful item for my home.

Cut squares

Rotary cutting make fabric preparation simple.

Finished coasters

I made just four of this combination because that was all of the leaf print that I had.

Fabric

I’ll be looking for more fabric combinations from my stash.

Revisiting the Art Question

A few weeks ago, I pulled some old kitchen utensils out of the drawer and put them up on the wall. Yes, But Is It Art?

framedtools

We’ve done it again with some things that may seem odd. This grouping shows that you can put together a collection of just about anything and make an arrangement.

math1First, the items were arranged on the table. Then we tried it out by laying the group on top of the frame, just to see if everything would fit.

math2

This time we used a shadow box to mount the items. These are available at most craft and hobby stores and they come in many sizes.

We tied everything to the backing with clear thread, reassembled the frame, and displayed it proudly in our living room.

math3

My daughter called it Nerdy Cool.

Yes, But Is It Art?

“A house is just a place to keep your stuff while you go out and get more stuff.”
-George Carlin-

 

This collection of old kitchen tools has been stored in a box for many years. They once belonged to my mother and grandmother and were long past their usefulness in the kitchen, even if I could get through all the rust. Keeping things like this always presents a dilemma. There is some sentimental value here even if there is little practical value.

kitchentools1

I don’t know where I first saw the idea of hanging a frame around 3D objects,  so I can’t credit anyone. I’m grateful to that person. It’s the perfect answer for what to do with my vintage finds.

toolsontable

I laid out the tools on my table, grouping and regrouping them, until I had a pleasing arrangement. Next, I measured the groupings for length and width, so that I would know the inside dimension of the frame I would need. The nearest second-hand store had plenty of frames to choose from. I took a tape measure with me so that I could measure the opening of each frame.

I tossed the frame contents, saved the glass for another use (which is still unknown at this time), and with a little acrylic paint, I made them a set.

Now, those tools grace the wall in my kitchen. They no longer have to hide in a box and I don’t have to wonder if I should keep them at all.  I still don’t know if it’s art.

framedtools